A handy list of links to installments of “The Kojiki–As Told By Brittany“, an educational project produced 2012-2015.

The Kojiki (711-712 AD), is the oldest chronicle of Japanese mythology, and together with the Nihonshoki (720 AD), it makes up the basis of Shinto religious/cultural practice. Most of content is the same, but there is some Nihonshoki-only material I’ll be making use of as well. Furthermore, the Izumo-no-Kuni-Fudoki (Chronicles of Ancient Izumo, 713-733 AD) is one of the most complete records of local folklore from this period, and the stories of deities included in that are also part of general Izumo mythology. These are the stories of Kami (gods) that have populated Japan since ancient times, and many of the legends took place in the San’in region. You can still visit the sites where a lot of these events took place!

Story 1: To Yomi and Back Again
Kuni-umi, Kami-umi, & Yomi-no-Kuni Houmon
Izanagi and Izanami
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
—-Matsue: Iya Shrine
—-Matsue: Yomotsuhirasaka
—-Matsue: Kamosu Shrine
—-Matsue: Manai Shrine

Story 2: Intoxicating the Serpent
Yamata-no-Orochi Taiji
One of the Yamata-no-Orochi heads discovered the sake

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
—-Unnan: Waters
—-Unnan (and then some): Sake, Inze-no-Tsubogami
—-Suga Shrine (Unnan) and Yaegaki Shrine (Matsue)

Story 3: The Hairless Hare of Inaba
Inaba no Shiro-Usagi
The White Hare will get what's coming to him
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
—-Tottori: Hakuto Beach and Hakuto Shrine
—-Izumo/Matsue: The White Hare in En-musubi

Story 4: Heave, ho! Kuni, ko!
~FUDOKI SPECIAL: Kunibiki~
Yatsuka drags over new land
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
—-The origins of the myth
—-The myth alive in the region
—-Ou-no-Mori, the Forest of Ou

Story 5: Fatal and Fateful Trials
Yasogami no Hakugai & Ne-no-Kuni Houmon
Onamuji and his mother
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10
Part 11
—-Akaiwa Shrine, Shimizui, and Ishinomiya Shrine
—-Oiwami Shrine, Tono Shrine, Mii Shrine
—-Yunokawa Onsen

Story 6: Beauty and the Crocasharkagator
~FUDOKI SPECIAL: Shitaiyama~
Tamahime

One-shot
—-Okuizumo: Oni-no-Shitaburui hiking spot

Story 7: Growing Pains of the Land and Family
Okuninushi-no-mikoto no Tsumadoi & Sukunabikona-no-kami to Kuni-tsukuri
~PLUS!: Shichifukujin~
Ebisu (aka Kotoshironushi)
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
—-Daikoku and Ebisu as local deities
—-Miho Shrine, the home of local deities under multiple names

Story 8: Birth and Bright Light 
~FUDOKI SPECIAL: Sada-no-Okami Tanjou~
Kisagai-hime and Baby Sada
Part 1
Part 2
—-Kaka-no-Kukedo, the marine caves
—-Hokki Shrine
—-Sada Shrine (Intro)
—-Sada Shrine (Architecture)
—-Sada Shin-Noh (UNESCO Intangible World Heritage)

Story 9: Relinquishing the Land
Kuniyuzuri
Okuninushi
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
—-Effects of handing over the land
—-Miho Shrine: Kuniyuzuri rituals
—-Izumo Taisha: Shrine Layout
—-Izumo Taisha: Kamiarizuki and En-musubi

Shinwa Nengajo (Mythology themed New Year greetings)
2013: Year of the Snake
2014: Year of the Horse
2015: Year of the Sheep
2016: Year of the Monkey

Note: For entertainment and narrative purposes, these are highly, highly simplified. These are meant to inform readers of the basics of the legends as they relate to the San’in region, and are no substitute for formal study. There is much more to know that is not captured in span of this project!

I own all of the artwork for these Kojiki interpretations. You are welcome to use them provided you credit Brittany Partin and provide the URL to San’in Monogatari (saninstory.wordpress.com), preferably as a link. Out of curiousity, I would also appreciate being informed how and where you use them!

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4 Responses to “The Kojiki Myths in Manga Form”

  1. takis Says:

    you are great takis efstathiou
    adviser to the koizumi lafcadio hearn family


  2. Have combined Okuninushi Manga into a small book for a class I’m taking as a presentation. Hope you don’t mind. I just passed the one copy around while I talked about Okuninushi.

    1. Buri-chan Says:

      Thrilled to hear it! Glad it was helpful for you, and thanks for letting me know.

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