Continued from Part 3









Refresh yourself on their story here.


Okuninushi’s troubles with Susano-o start here.



We’ll end here on that ambiguous note for now, but there are still two more stories to come!

In the meantime, we’ve got some explaining to do about all these mysterious identities, as all of them are wrapped up into the local San’in culture.

Learn about the sites and culture associated with this legend!
Daikoku and Ebisu, the lucky gods
Ebisu’s home, Miho Shrine

Or start reading the next story!
The birth of Sada-no-Okami
(Or keep reading to the conclusion of Okuninushi’s story)

Or see the Kojiki a.t.b.b. masterlist!
The Kojiki Myths in Manga Form

Continued from Part 2
















Continued in Part 4

Continued from Part 1


Historically, there was tension between the Izumo and Yamato regions. We’ll touch more on this in a later story.









Continued in Part 3


A.K.A. Onamuji–refresh yourself on the stories of Okuninushi starting here and here.













According to the Kunibiki legend, there’s a good reason why Mihonoseki looks like Koshi.

Continued in Part 2

This is local mythology that fits in alongside the Shinto legends known throughout the country, but it was recorded in the Izumo-no-Kuni-Fudoki (Chronicles of Ancient Izumo, 713-733 AD) as opposed to the Kojiki (711-712 AD) or Nihonshoki (720 AD). The manga this time is a single installment, and we’ll take a look at the associated geography in the following entry.


Don’t forget who Okuninushi is! He’ll continue to be important.
Why the ropes? That’s in reference to Kunibiki (start reading that story Fudoki story here.)



Recall that we first encountered these creatures in the story of the White Hare of Inaba. We’re fairly comfortable calling them sharks (in modern Japanese, same), but the word used in the archaic context is wani (translated from modern Japanese, “crocodile”).







Learn about the sites associated with this legend!
One of my favorite hiking spots in the San’in region, Oni-no-Shitaburui–where the crocasharkgator is stuck!

Or start reading the next story!
The rapid expansion of Okuninushi’s love life and rule over the land

(Note: This is local mythology that fits in alongside the Shinto legends known throughout the country, but it was recorded in the Izumo-no-Kuni-Fudoki (Chronicles of Ancient Izumo, 713-733 AD) as opposed to the Kojiki (711-712 AD) or Nihonshoki (720 AD).)

Or see the Kojiki a.t.b.b. masterlist!
The Kojiki Myths in Manga Form

Continued from Part 10






Recall how the White Hare served as matchmaker for these two.




This son would wind up being named after “a fork in a tree,” Ki-no-mata-no-kami.

For as long as this story was, there are surprisingly few places to introduce associated with it–but places exist nearby nonetheless! After all, Shinto shrines can be associated with very surprising things.

I’m planning on some more short stories, especially with material from the Izumo Fudoki, to intersperse with the following Kojiki stories. Okuninushi will continue to be a main character–after all, being the lord of the land has a way of propelling one into main character status in many legends.

Learn about the sites associated with this legend!
Akaiwa Shrine, Shimizui, and Ishinomiya Shrine
Oiwami Shrine, Tono Shrine, and Mii Shrine
Yunokawa Onsen
And good old Yomotsu Hirasaka, the entrance to Yomi

Or start reading the next story!
The short story of a lovestruck (and stuck) Crocasharkagator
(Or you can continue following Okuninushi’s adventures)

Or see the Kojiki a.t.b.b. masterlist!
The Kojiki Myths in Manga Form

Continued from Part 9

Yes, this setting should look familiar.











Continued in Part 11

Continued from Part 8













Continued in Part 10

Continued from Part 7











Continued in Part 9

Continued from Part 6








After all, young Susano-o did.



Continued in Part 8