We haven’t gotten a lot of snow this winter, but there’s still been enough to go get some classic views of the scenery around Matsue Castle.




The retro-style LakeLine Bus goes around all the major tourist spots and transportation hubs in central Matsue, and a day pass is 500 yen.


The “Matsu” in “Matsue” means “pine,” and this is one of my favorite pines among the many around Matsue Castle.


Migratory birds flock here in winter. I think these are all cormorants.



The Izumo-style Japanese garden at the Matsue History Museum, as seen from Kiharu, the cafe inside with its own characteristic wagashi (Japanese confectioneries) which change motifs every month.


The Horikawa Sightseeing Boat makes its rounds, with kotatsu provided all winter.


This is the main venue for the Daichakai on the first weekend of October. Image this space covered with tents for different schools of the tea ceremony to try.


Lookin’ good as usual, you National Treasure, you.


Matsue Shrine, down the stairs from the castle tower.


Winter can be pretty, but it’s cold.




An equestrian statue of good old Matsudaira Naomasa. I say “old” but in this statue, he’s still a baby-faced 14-year-old. A 14-year-old who kicked butt in the Battle of Osaka.


Shiomi Nawate Street, along the northern moat.


Oh no, a ninja snowball attack! Take cover!


Uh oh… a ninja victim. Just one more ghost story to add to Matsue’s list, I suppose.

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